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The Mono-logue » Gabrielle, Project Specialist

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Holiday shopping: Gifts the kids will love!

Saturday, November 19th, 2016 by Gabrielle, Project Specialist
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Season’s greetings! The holidays are just around the corner and our fall catalog features gifts the kids will love. From familiar local animals to books that the whole family will enjoy, you are sure to find the perfect gift for any budding naturalist.

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Finger puppets: Bring your wild friends from the Mono Basin home with you to play! These plush, lovable, and high-quality Folkmanis finger puppets make for great interactive play. Choose from three Mono Basin species: bobcat, fawn, and Western Tanager. (more…)

Deer migration season in the Eastern Sierra

Sunday, September 25th, 2016 by Gabrielle, Project Specialist
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Dear travelers and locals alike,

If you’ve ever spent time driving Highway 395, especially during fall or spring, you’ve most likely had the chance to see one of the Eastern Sierra’s many mule deer.

Family of mule deer enjoy a beautiful day at County Park. Photo by Sandra Noll.

Family of mule deer at County Park. Photo by Sandra Noll.

These beautiful animals are part of the Round Valley mule deer herd. Every spring they migrate to higher elevations to give birth and feed on the foliage of alpine meadows, returning each (more…)

Owens River Fire update: Monday morning

Monday, September 19th, 2016 by Gabrielle, Project Specialist
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The Owens River Fire has grown to 6,000 acres and is now 20% contained. Four uninhabited outbuildings have been destroyed.

Air crews work hard to contain the Owens River Fire. Photo by Justin Benttinen. Courtesy of InciWeb.

Air crews work hard to contain the Owens River Fire. Photo by Justin Benttinen, courtesy of InciWeb.

Firefighters are working hard to protect additional structures and contain spot fires along the western flank. Today’s weather remains hot and dry with a chance of increased wind from the southwest. The Big Springs Campground and Clark (more…)

Owens River Fire

Sunday, September 18th, 2016 by Gabrielle, Project Specialist
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Just over a month since the Clark Fire, another fire has erupted in the area.

Smoke From the Owens River Fire on Saturday 9/17. Photo by Bartshe Miller.

Smoke from the Owens River Fire on Saturday, September 17. Photo by Bartshe Miller.

The Owens River Fire is burning north of and along Owens River Road and east of Highway 395 near Clark Canyon. The fire was detected yesterday afternoon and is thought to be human-caused. As of this morning the fire is about 4,500 acres and 10% contained; the Big Springs Campground, Clark Canyon, and surrounding ranches have been evacuated. Heavy smoke is (more…)

Expanded fire restrictions in the Inyo National Forest

Saturday, July 30th, 2016 by Gabrielle, Project Specialist
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Previous fire restrictions for Inyo National Forest have been expanded to include all wilderness areas. These new fire restrictions took effect this past Friday July 29, and will stay in effect until the end of the season. Here’s what you need to know:

  • No campfires, briquette barbeques, or stove fires are allowed outside of developed recreation sites and specifically posted campsites or areas.
  • With a valid California Campfire Permit you are allowed to use portable stoves or lanterns using gas, jellied petroleum, or pressurized liquid fuel.
  • No fireworks.
  • No smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable material.

Never leave fires unattended and always make sure to completely extinguish your campfire. A single spark can cause major damage, even in designated campgrounds or recreation areas. To learn more about fire safety or obtain a California Campfire Permit visit your local Forest Service visitor center or go online to Prevent Wildfire CA.

Mono Lake Committee seasonal staff are here and summer is in full swing

Sunday, June 12th, 2016 by Gabrielle, Project Specialist
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Summer is here! With the warm weather comes many changes; deer and birds are migrating, bears have woken from hibernation, and the Mono Lake Committee’s flock of seasonal staff has finally arrived. Training began June 1 and we’ve been busy from day one, excitedly preparing for the months ahead.

Andrew, Sara, and Grace paddle the route that Mono Lake Committee canoe tours take during the summer months. Photo by Gabby Renteria.

Our first day was filled with the usual: introductions, paperwork, and an awesome talk from Mike Hogan who is working hard to make sure the Caltrans Rockfall Project not only solves the issue of falling rocks but also leaves the hills on the west side of Mono Lake beautiful and habitable for the many animals here in the Mono Basin.

After that we wasted no time and jumped straight in with two days of canoe training. The first day was spent practicing (more…)

The unBEARable truth

Friday, July 31st, 2015 by Gabrielle, Project Specialist
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Welcome to the Sierra Nevada, home to 40% of California’s black bear population! Here in the Mono Basin bears are our neighbors and it’s important that we keep good relationships with them. To do this we have to ensure they aren’t eating human food.

In a rare sight, a blonde black bear was spotted running on the east shore of Mono Lake in late August, 2007. Photo courtesy of Chris McCreedy.

In a rare sight, a blonde black bear was spotted running on the east shore of Mono Lake in late August, 2007. Photo courtesy of Chris McCreedy.

The moment a bear gets its first taste of high-calorie human food, its life expectancy gets cut in half. Before long bears start coming further into town, putting themselves in danger and causing serious property damage.

The good news is that we can prevent all of this. All we have to do is keep our food out of their reach. Here are some bear safety tips:

  • Never leave food or garbage outside
  • Use and lock bear-proof dumpsters and trash cans when throwing things out
  • Never, ever, ever leave food in your car (bears open cars as easily as we open cans!)
  • Never leave trash, sunscreen, chapstick, grocery bags, wrappers, or coolers in your car (bears in this area have learned to recognize these things as signs of food)
  • Use bear boxes to store food when camping or leaving a trailhead
  • Use approved bear canisters when camping in the the backcountry (you can rent these at the Mono Basin Scenic Area Visitor Center or the Wilderness Centers in Tuolumne Meadows and Yosemite Valley)
  • Most importantly, remember that bears don’t want to hurt you but they are incredibly powerful creatures

Be bear aware to keep our bears wild and healthy!

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