today at mono lake


The Mono-logue


Major Categories   Search Blog:

The Mono-logue » Historical Photos

‘Historical Photos’ Category

Historic images of Yosemite and the Mono Basin

Friday, September 28th, 2018 by Greg, Information & Restoration Specialist
Share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

The Yosemite Museum has published online over 6,500 images of Yosemite and surrounding areas in its Yosemite Historic Photo Collection. There are also photos of people, cultural artifacts, maps, and documents related to Yosemite.

Mono Lake from Bloody Canyon, August 1931

Mono Lake from Bloody Canyon, August 1931

A large portion of the collection consists of beautiful Paiute and Miwok baskets. The Mono Basin—portions of it were once a part of the original National Park—is featured in many of the photos. Here is a sampling of Mono Basin shots that can be found in this amazing resource: (more…)

Mono Lake Committee initiates study of Mono Basin glaciers

Friday, September 7th, 2018 by Mono Lake Committee Staff
Share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Jace Shuler, a junior math major at Boston College, started a study of Mono Basin glaciers when he worked at the Mono Lake Committee this summer. This post was written by Jace.

When I tell people that I spent the summer studying and mapping the glaciers in the Mono Basin, the question I always seem to get is, “There are glaciers around Mono Lake?” The short answer is, yes, there are, and they are of great interest to the Mono Lake Committee.

The first step of my project with the Committee was to identify what exists in the area, both in terms of glaciers and data about those glaciers. From there (more…)

Refreshing’ Ologists: Mono Basin glaciers with Jace Shuler

Saturday, August 18th, 2018 by Joslyn, Project Specialist
Share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Join us on Wednesday, August 22 at 4:00pm in the Mono Lake Committee gallery for this week’s Refreshments with Refreshing ‘Ologists presentation. Jace Shuler will be presenting his findings from his undergraduate research project on glaciers in the Mono Basin.

Changes in the Kuna glacier (left) and the Koip glacier (right) between 1985 (top) and 2014 (bottom). Photos courtesy of Jace Shuler.

Jace will discuss the status of the four glaciers in the Mono Basin—Conness, Dana, Kuna, and Koip glaciers. He has been using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and aerial photos to examine how the surface area of the glaciers has changed since 1951, as well as working on how we can use the same tools to forecast the glaciers’ future. It’s important to educate both the public and policymakers about the effects of climate change on the Mono Basin, and Jace’s work contributes to that effort.

Birds and Basques in the Mono Basin

Monday, August 3rd, 2015 by Mono Lake Committee Staff
Share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

This post was written by Sandra Noll, Birding Intern in 2014, 2015, & 2016.

An elegant 60-year-old arborglyph, likely Basque in origin. Photo by Sandra Noll.

An elegant 60-year-old arborglyph, likely Basque in origin. Photo by Sandra Noll.

Birding is often about much more than birds, a truth evidenced by the breadth of offerings at the annual Mono Basin Bird Chautauqua. Recently I arranged a birding excursion with friends to one of the Mono Basin’s many canyons, where I was equally enchanted by Red-breasted Sapsuckers flying in and out of tree-cavity nests with morsels for hungry chicks and by historic Basque, Mexican, and South American carvings on the aspen trees.

A Red-breasted Sapsucker checks its nest cavity before flying off to forage in response to its chick’s incessant demands for food. Photo by Sandra Noll.

A Red-breasted Sapsucker checks its nest cavity before flying off to forage in response to its chick’s incessant demands for food. Photo by Sandra Noll.

Aspen tree carvings (arborglyphs) were created by sheepherders—initially Basques from the Pyrenees Mountains straddling today’s France and Spain, and later by shepherds from Mexico and South America—during their lonely summer vigils tending large flocks in remote high country pastures. Campsites were often established in cool aspen forests near a creek; habitats similar to Bohler Canyon. It’s quite an experience to be birding and suddenly come face to face with historic documents growing on trees! (more…)

Library of Congress’ Chronicling America gives a glimpse of Mono Lake over 150 years ago

Sunday, January 25th, 2015 by Mono Lake Committee Staff
Share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditShare on TumblrEmail this to someone
Photo courtesy of Chronicling America.

Photo courtesy of Chronicling America.

This post was written by Barbara Ball, 2015 Information Center & Bookstore Manager.

Want to leap into your time machine and take a trip back to Mono Lake 100 years ago? If you go to this Library of Congress web page, you can do this without the probable jet lag or the awkward need for period-specific clothing that an actual time machine might provide.

A few years ago, the Library of Congress started Chronicling America, a massive project to scan and upload full-text newspapers from 1836-1922 to the Internet so that they are freely readable and searchable by all. Chronicling America is an astounding resource. I love going there and researching places I’ve been, famous people I’ve heard of—to see how they were regarded in (more…)

Mono Lake advocate Martin Litton passes away at age 97

Friday, December 5th, 2014 by Greg, Information & Restoration Specialist
Share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditShare on TumblrEmail this to someone
1935 letter to L.A. Times

1935 letter to LA Times

Environmental activist, Colorado River guide, World War II pilot, former Sierra Club board member, and former Sunset Magazine travel editor Martin Litton passed away on Sunday at the age of 97. He was an outspoken and uncompromising advocate for protecting wild places, including Mono Lake. At the age of 18, he wrote a letter to the editor that was published in the Los Angeles Times on October 27, 1935:

To Save Mono Lake

     INGLEWOOD, Oct 21.—[To the Editor of The Times:] For the disappearance of Owens Lake there is some excuse. Los Angeles really needed the water. But when our City of the Angels will wantonly dry up beautiful, mysterious Mono Lake to selfishly add a few unnecessary gallons to an already adequate supply, things are going a little too far. The people of the Owens Valley region are already deeply resentful toward the great city which has made their once fertile and productive land into a barren desert waste. The people of the entire State should rise up against the destruction of Mono Lake. Mono Lake is a gem—among California’s greatest scenic attractions—a beautiful and historic landmark which must not be destroyed.

MARTIN LITTON

Martin Litton, president of Sequoia Forestkeeper, talking with Mono Lake Committee Board Member Andrea Lawrence and the Committee's then-Office Director Erika Obedzinski, at the 2008 Sierra Nevada Alliance Conference in King's Beach. Andrea passed away six months after this photo was taken, and Martin passed away this past Sunday. They both were a large part of many environmental victories during their inspirational and achievement-filled lives.

Martin Litton, president of Sequoia Forestkeeper, talking with Mono Lake Committee Board Member Andrea Lawrence and the Committee's then-Office Director Erika Obedzinski, at the 2008 Sierra Nevada Alliance Conference in King's Beach. Andrea passed away six months after this photo was taken, and Martin passed away this past Sunday. They both were a large part of many environmental victories during their inspirational and achievement-filled lives. Photo by Greg Reis.

Los Angeles Aqueduct centennial events and coverage

Friday, November 1st, 2013 by Elin, Communications Coordinator
Share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

Next Tuesday, November 5 marks 100 years to the day of the opening of the Los Angeles Aqueduct from Owens Valley to the city in 1913.

Eastern Sierra water cascades down into the LA Basin on November 5, 1913. Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Times.

It changed the landscape, Eastern Sierra watershed, social fabric, and political climate of California forever, for better and worse. Take a look at these centennial commemorative pieces (more…)

1913-2013: Los Angeles Aqueduct centennial

Friday, August 16th, 2013 by Greg, Information & Restoration Specialist
Share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

On November 5, 1913, the Los Angeles Aqueduct delivered Owens Valley water to Los Angeles for the first time. This year, the City of Los Angeles marks the hundredth anniversary of its engineering marvel with celebrations, websites, exhibits, a centennial garden, and even a hundred mules walking on the aqueduct.

Construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct in the Eastern Sierra, early 1900s. Mono Lake Committee archive photo.

(more…)

Huell Howser: An amazing man with an amazing impact

Monday, January 7th, 2013 by Arya, Communications Director
Share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

We are sad to relay the news that longtime supporter and friend to Mono Lake, Huell Howser has passed away. Huell introduced countless people to Mono Lake through his first visit with “California’s Gold” in 1992 and then again in 2008 when he returned to film another episode, “Mono Lake Today,” about the exciting restoration progress.

Huell Howser paddling at South Tufa with Mono Lake Committee Executive Director Geoffrey McQuilkin in 2008. Photo by Arya Degenhardt.

It’s not uncommon for us to hear visitors say, “I first learned about Mono Lake from Huell Howser (more…)

Storefront grand re-opening

Tuesday, August 7th, 2012 by Mono Lake Committee Staff
Share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditShare on TumblrEmail this to someone

This post was written by Rosanne Catron, 2012 Office Director.

On Friday, August 3, community members, friends, and Mono Lake Committee staff and members gathered to celebrate the re-opening of the Mono Lake Committee Information Center & Bookstore storefront. The improvements, made possible in part by a generous bequest from longtime Committee member Grace de Laet, were three years in the making, with many decisions, large and small, to make along the way. Let’s take a look at the remodel process and some pictures of our new storefront.

Mono Lake Committee Staff Discuss Storefront Remodel

In July 2010, Mono Lake Committee staff met with architects Siegel & Strain to brainstorm ideas for the new storefront. Photo by Arya Degenhardt.

(more…)

The Mono-logue is powered by Wordpress
Subscribe to entries with RSS or by Email. Subscribe to comments (RSS).

Find us on Facebook

 

Follow us on Twitter

 

Print this page
print

search | contact us | site map 
 

MLC Logo

© 2018 mono lake committee
The Mono Lake Committee is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.