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Posts Tagged ‘Refreshing ‘Ologists’

Refreshing ‘Ologists: California Spotted Owls and fire

Sunday, September 4th, 2016 by Mono Lake Committee Staff
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This post was written by Grace Aleman, 2015 Information Center & Bookstore Assistant and 2016 Mono Lake Intern.

The Refreshing ‘Ologist series continues this Wednesday, September 7 at 4:00pm in the Mono Lake Committee gallery.

A Spotted Owl in a redwood forest. Photo courtesy of Michel Nichols/National Geographic Creative.

A Spotted Owl in a redwood forest. Photo courtesy of Michel Nichols/National Geographic Creative.

Join us to to learn how fire affects California Spotted Owl habitat. Fire has long been a part of the Sierra Nevada forests, but many years of fire suppression have lead to an increase in stand-replacing fires. Yosemite National Park biologist Stephanie Eyes will discuss how these high-intensity fires affect California Spotted Owl habitat use, and are a potential cause of habitat loss. Stephanie used radio telemetry to monitor California Spotted Owls and determine if their foraging patterns showed preference different levels of burned forest.

Refreshing ‘Ologists: Bats in Yosemite’s Poopenaut Valley

Sunday, August 28th, 2016 by Mono Lake Committee Staff
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This post was written by Grace Aleman, 2015 Information Center & Bookstore Assistant and 2016 Mono Lake Intern.

After a one-week hiatus, the Refreshing ‘Ologist series continues this Wednesday, August 31 at 4:00pm in the Mono Lake Committee gallery.

Elin

A day-flying bat in the Mono Basin (likely a big brown bat); join us on Wednesday to hear about the Poopenaut Valley bat species. Photo by Elin Ljung.

Yosemite National Park is home to 17 different bat species, five of which have special status due to statewide population declines. Much of the bat decline in California is due habitat loss, making the remaining pieces of bat habitat even more critical. Most of the bat species found in Yosemite are found in the Poopenaut Valley—a unique area near Hetch Hetchy Reservoir with meadows, riparian habitats, and a seasonal pond. Join to hear from Yosemite biologist Breeanne Jackson about the current monitoring projects regarding bats in the Poopenaut Valley.

Refreshing ‘Ologists: Sierra Nevada glaciers

Sunday, August 14th, 2016 by Mono Lake Committee Staff
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This post was written by Grace Aleman, 2015 Information Center & Bookstore Assistant and 2016 Mono Lake Intern.

Much of Yosemite National Park’s most iconic landforms, such as the granite cliffs of Yosemite Valley and the rounded domes of Tuolumne Meadows, were shaped by glaciers. These glaciers were ubiquitous to the Sierra Nevada landscape for millions of years. More recently, however, we’re starting to see these glaciers vanish due to climate change.

Photo courtesy of the National Park Service.

A photograph of the Lyell Glacier taken in 1883 by Israel Russel contrasts sharply with the extent of the glacier in 2013. Photo courtesy of the National Park Service.

Join us this Wednesday, August 17 at 4:00pm in the Mono Lake Committee gallery to learn more about the fate of Sierra Nevada glaciers. Yosemite National Park geologist Greg Stock will discuss the Sierra Nevada glacial history and how modern-day climate change is affecting these glaciers.

Refreshing ‘Ologists: What the heck is a land trust?

Sunday, August 7th, 2016 by Mono Lake Committee Staff
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This post was written by Grace Aleman, 2015 Information Center & Bookstore Assistant and 2016 Mono Lake Intern.

If you’ve ever found yourself wondering “what the heck is a land trust?”‘ we’ve got the answer in this week’s Refreshing ‘Ologist lecture. Come to the Mono Lake Committee gallery this Wednesday, August 3 at 4:00pm to have all your questions answered!

The Mono Basin has several parcels of land that have easements with the Eastern Sierra Land Trust. Photo by Erv Nichols.

The Mono Basin has several parcels of land that have easements with the Eastern Sierra Land Trust. Photo by Erv Nichols.

The Eastern Sierra is a beautiful region with fascinating natural and cultural history. This area has drawn people in for generations for countless reasons—wildlife, ranching, and agriculture, to name a few. The Eastern Sierra Land Trust‘s Executive Director, Kay Odgen, will explain land trusts and how they can help protect critical habitats as well as help owners maintain their land.

Refreshing ‘Ologists: Sierra Nevada rain shadow

Sunday, July 31st, 2016 by Mono Lake Committee Staff
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This post was written by Grace Aleman, 2015 Information Center & Bookstore Assistant and 2016 Mono Lake Intern.

Curious about what makes the east side of the Sierra Nevada so much drier than the west side? Join us this Wednesday, August 3 at 4:00pm in the Mono Lake Committee gallery to learn more, in the latest Refreshing ‘Ologist lecture….

Photo by Andrew Youssef.

The Mono Basin lies on the drier, eastern side of the Sierra Nevada. Photo by Andrew Youssef.

Benjamin Hatchett, a research scientist at the Desert Research Institute, will discuss what creates a stronger or weaker rain shadow effect during storms. He will also talk about how changes in the rain shadow affect streamflow on the dry side of mountains. Similarly, terminal lakes such as Mono Lake can act as rain gauges that rise and fall due to precipitation that falls within the rain shadow. Hope to see you there!

Refreshing ‘Ologists: Peregrines return to Yosemite National Park

Sunday, July 24th, 2016 by Mono Lake Committee Staff
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A Perigrine Falcon eyrie. Photo courtesy of the US Fish & Wildlife Service.

A Peregrine Falcon eyrie. Photo courtesy of the US Fish & Wildlife Service.

This post was written by Grace Aleman, 2015 Information Center & Bookstore Assistant and 2016 Mono Lake Intern.

The Refreshing ‘Ologist series continues this Wednesday, July 27 at 4:00pm in the Mono Lake Committee Gallery.

Ever wonder why certain climbing routes in Yosemite National Park close in summer for nesting birds? Come learn about the amazing recovery the American Peregrine Falcon has made in Yosemite National Park with Crystal Barnes, Yosemite’s raptor monitor. Crystal will discuss what lead to the falcon’s population decline and how ongoing monitoring projects paired with improved management practices have lead to the peregrine’s removal from California’s endangered species list and its current success in Yosemite. See you on Wednesday!

Refreshments with Refreshing ‘Ologists: Native herptiles in Yosemite

Sunday, July 10th, 2016 by Mono Lake Committee Staff
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This post was written by Grace Aleman, 2015 Information Center & Bookstore Assistant and 2016 Mono Lake Intern.

Join us this Wednesday, July 13 at 4:00pm in the Mono Lake Committee Gallery for the first of our Refreshing ‘Ologist series: Recovery and Conservation of Native Herptiles in Yosemite.

Yellow-legged frog. Photo by Nora Livingston.

Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog. Photo by Nora Livingston.

In this summer’s first lecture we will hear from Yosemite Wildlife Biologists Ninette Daniele and Molly Thompson. They will discuss the current conservation strategies being used to protect native herptiles, like the Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog, Yosemite toad, and other herptiles in Yosemite National Park. They will also discuss how well these strategies are working and what types of recoveries they are seeing. Join us to learn more!

Refreshments with Refreshing ‘Ologists at the Mono Lake Committee

Friday, July 8th, 2016 by Mono Lake Committee Staff
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This post was written by Grace Aleman, 2015 Information Center & Bookstore Assistant and 2016 Mono Lake Intern.

Refreshments with Refreshing ‘Ologists is a summer lecture series with local scientists presenting their current work in the region.

Join local researchers on Wednesday afternoons for short talks about their scientific work. Plus, refreshments! Photo by Elin Ljung.

Join local researchers on Wednesday afternoons for short talks about their scientific work. Plus, refreshments! Photo by Arya Degenhardt.

Presentations will be hosted in the Mono Lake Committee Information Center & Bookstore gallery, and last about one hour. Light refreshments will be served. All presentations begin at 4:00pm. This summer’s schedule is:

● July 13: Amphibians in Yosemite with biologist Ninette Daniele
● July 20: Bighorn sheep migration with Lacey Greene of the California Department of Fish & Wildlife**
● July 27: Peregrine Falcons in Yosemite National Park with raptor monitor Crystal Barnes
● August 3: Climate change with Benjamin Hatchett, Department of Geography, University of Nevada Reno
● August 10: Land management with Kay Ogden of the Eastern Sierra Land Trust
● August 17: Mono Basin geology with Yosemite National Park geologist Greg Stock
● August 31: Bird and bat population dynamics with biologist Breeanne Jackson
● September 7: The California spotted owl with biologist Stephanie Eyes
● September 14: El Niño winters in the Sierra with avalanche forecaster Sue Burak

**This presentation starts at 5:00pm, NOT 4:00pm.

Check back for weekly posts with more details about each lecture. We hope to see you here on Wednesday afternoons for these talks!

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